Year of Shakespeare 2019

 

I signed up to join the 2019 Year of Shakespeare challenge with Hibernatorslibrary.  The goal is to read one comedy in January-April, one history in May-August, and one tragedy in September-December.

I plan to start with Taming of the Shrew.

Feel free to join me!

 

When are you reading? Challenge

Sam at Taking on a World of Words is hosting a When are you reading? challenge that I am pledging to complete.  The challenge is based on when a work is set (or written).  I have reproduced her rules below.  Check it out and join me!

Thanks, Sam!

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Happy New Year! It’s January 1st and that means it’s day 1 of the 2016 When Are You Reading? Challenge! In case you missed my previous post, I’ve put the ‘rules’ below. Please let me know if you’ve decided to join, I’d love to have you all be a part of this fun challenge.

I’m hosting the 3rd annual When Are You Reading? Challenge! It’s a short challenge, only 12 books, which challenges you to read books set or published in different time periods. Those periods are:

  • Pre 1500
  • 1500-1599
  • 1600-1699
  • 1700-1799
  • 1800-1899
  • 1900-1919
  • 1920-1939
  • 1940-1959
  • 1960-1979
  • 1980-1999
  • 2000-Present
  • The Future

At only one book a month, this one has always been fast and fun. Often I find the books I was going to read anyway fit into the time periods. There are very few ‘rules’ associated with the challenge. I put it in quotations because you’re free to do what you want with it.

‘Rules’

  • Determination of what year a book belongs in is the decision of the participant. On the whole, choose a year where the largest part of the action occurs or the most important event.
  • I will compile a list of those participating on this page but you must link back to this page to be added to the list so that other participants can find us!

It works best if you dedicate a page or post to tracking your books so I can link to it. I had four participants last year and I’m hoping to up that again this year.

If  you’re interested, let me know and grab the graphic my fabulous husband designed (isn’t he great?!) to let others know you’re participating. I can’t wait for you to join!

Pages for the 2016 challenge are up now. Please click on over here and here for more info.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Back to the Classics Reading Challenge

Book Shelf

 

Karen at Books and Chocolate is hosting a Back to the Classics reading challenge for 2016.  Participants pledge to read 12 classic books throughout the year, following these guidelines:

1.  A 19th Century Classic – any book published between 1800 and 1899.

2.  A 20th Century Classic – any book published between 1900 and 1966.Just like last year, all books MUST have been published at least 50 years ago to qualify. The only exception is books written at least 50 years ago, but published later.

3.  A classic by a woman author.

4.  A classic in translation.  Any book originally written published in a language other than your native language. Feel free to read the book in your language or the original language.

5.  A classic by a non-white author. Can be African-American, Asian, Latino, Native American, etc.

6.  An adventure classic – can be fiction or non-fiction.

7.  A fantasy, science fiction, or dystopian classic. Dystopian could include classics like 1984.

8.  A classic detective novel. It must include a detective, amateur or professional. This list of books from the Golden Age of Detective Fiction is a great starting point if you’re looking for ideas.

9.  A classic which includes the name of a place in the title.  It can be the name of a house, a town, a street, etc. Examples include Bleak House, Main Street, The Belly of Paris, or The Vicar of Wakefield.

10. A classic which has been banned or censored. If possible, please mention why this book was banned or censored in your review.

11. Re-read a classic you read in school (high school or college).  If it’s a book you loved, does it stand the test of time?  If it’s a book you disliked, is it any better a second time around?

12. A volume of classic short stories. This must be one complete volume, at least 8 short stories. It can be an anthology of stories by different authors, or all the stories can be by a single author. Children’s stories are acceptable in this category only.

I hereby pledge to join this challenge.  I do not have a list of which books I will read, but I think I will read in the order of the list.  (I do not remember if that is part of the rules.)

Who else is in?

Around the World Reading Challenge, 2015

I invite everyone to join me in a reading challenge for 2015.  The rules are simple:

1)  Agree to read and blog about at least six books in 2015, with the following stipulations:

  • At least one book must be by a North American author.
  • At least one book must be by a South American author.
  • At least one book must be by a European author.
  • At least one book must be by an African author.
  • At least one book must be by an Asian author.
  • At least one book must be by an Australian author.

2)  The books may be fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama–anything.

3)  The authors may be from any time period, dead or alive.

4)  If you want to participate, just indicate your interest, along with the link to your blog, in the comments section.

5)  After you have done a blog post for this challenge, indicate that you have done so in the comments section, include the name of the book and author, and provide a link to your post

That’s it!  Happy reading and blogging! Hope to read your posts next year!

Here is the link to the Official Around the World Reading Challenge Page: https://debrabooks.wordpress.com/around-the-world-reading-challenge-2015/