Boadicea and Her Daughters

I am posting this photo for Skywatch Friday, a site where bloggers are invited to post pictures that include the sky.  The sculpture in this photo depicts Boadicea (aka Boudica) and Her Daughters.  Boudica was the queen of a Celtic tribe during the period of the Roman invasions.  She led an uprising of her tribe against the Romans in around 60 A.D.  Her people lost, but they gave the Romans a good fight.

This sculpture is by Thomas Thornycroft, who worked on it from 1856-1883.  It is located in London on Westminster bridge, facing Big Ben.

Let’s give three cheers for Boudica for taking on the Romans!

 

Changing Seasons: February

vday-dinner

I am participating in Cardinal Guzman’s Changing Seasons photography challenge.

The challenge is to find one picture that best represents that month.

The highlight of this month for me was a weekend getaway my husband and I took to the Outing Lodge.  (See here for more photos.)   We stayed on Valentine’s Day weekend, and the trip included a lavish Valentine’s Day dinner at the lodge, followed by tango lessons.  This photo serves as my souvenir of that evening.

How was your February?

 

Changing Seasons 2017: January

 

january-2

This is my January entry for Cardinal Guzman’s 2017  Changing Seasons Photo Challenge.  I am doing Option 2 in which we choose one photo that represents the month to us.

I live in Minnesota (USA) and it’s been a tough week for weather, with below zero (Fahrenheit) temperatures and several snow storms.  I’m not a big fan of January.

thechangingseasons_6367

 

 

Resilient Photo Challenge

summer-palace

 

This week’s Photo Challenge at the Daily Post is the word “resilient.”  This photo is my interpretation of this word.  It was taken at the Summer Palace outside of Beijing, China.  As the world’s oldest continuous civilization, China exemplifies “resilience” to  me.

 

2016 in 12 Pictures

Paula at Lost in Translation suggested a challenge:  post 12 photos from 2016 that represent your year.  I am joining her challenge.  My photos represent places I visited in 2016.  (None were international and most were within a few hours of driving distance from my home.) It’s a nice way to close out the year.

 

 

The places depicted include Minneapolis, MN; the North Shore of Lake Superior (MN);  Holcombe, WI;  Plymouth, MA; Boston, MA; Louisville, KY; Washington, DC; Cable, WI; Baxter, MN; New Ulm, MN; Chicago, IL.

I’d love to see your 12 photos!

Wonderful Minneapolis B & B: 300 Clifton

I love old houses, especially mansions.  I also love that many of them have been turned into Bed and Breakfasts so that I can occasionally spend the night in one of them and pretend I am a grand dame.  Last night, my husband I spent the evening in a historic Minneapolis home: 300 Clifton.

This house was originally built in 1887 in the Queen Anne style, festooned with turrets, porches, and other architectural “eye candy.”  In 1905, the house was purchased by Eugene and Merrette Carpenter, who renovated the home dramatically, transforming the Victorian house to a Georgian Revival.

After 1948, the house was no longer a single-family dwelling.  For a while, it served as a boarding house, and later, it was turned into offices.  Eventually, it fell into disrepair and was on the verge of being condemned.

The present owners, John and Norman, bought the house a few years ago and lovingly transformed it back to its original beauty and opened it as a Bed and Breakfast in the heart of historical Minneapolis.  (The gallery of photos below were taken there during our stay.)

For me, one of the best parts of staying at the house was listening to John tell his guests the history of the house and its original owner, Eugene Carpenter, who was instrumental in transforming Minneapolis from a dusty industrial town to a flourishing center for the arts. John is both knowledgeable and passionate about his subject and can regale his guests for hours with tales from the past.

For more information about the history of the house, click here.  For information about staying at the house, click here.

I have stayed there twice now, and would love to go back again.  I highly recommend it for anyone interested in old homes, history, and the arts.

Changing Seasons Photo Challenge: December

Last January, I joined in Cardinal Guzman’s “The Changing Seasons” monthly photo challenge.  The goal is to choose one place near one’s home and take monthly photos to document the changing seasons.

I chose to focus on Murphy Hanrehan Park, which is near my home in Minnesota.  Alas, I neglected my blog for most of the  year, so I did not fully complete the challenge.  I did want to post my December photos, though, to round out the year. It is a dreary time year, especially since we have almost no snow on the ground.

My January entry to this challenge is here.  March is here, and May is here.

Travel Theme: Naughty or Nice?

Burro Beggar

Ailsa at Where’s My Backpack hosts a weekly travel photography theme.  This week’s theme is Naughty or Nice? 

My submission for the Naughty or Nice theme is this picture I took of a begging burro at Custer State Park last summer.  Technically, he (or she?) is being naughty by stopping a car on the road through the park, sticking his head in the window and begging for food.  But the burro was so cute that we couldn’t help but like the guy.  (Unfortunately, we didn’t have any food on us.)

I’m going to say this dude was NICE, even though he was part of a larger gang of feral burros who made their living by holding up every car that passed, just like the feared bandits of olden tymes.

Burro gang

The Changing Seasons Monthly Photo Challenge: Murphy Hanrehan Park

This is my May installment of my Monthly Photo Challenge: The Changing Seasons, hosted by Cardinal Guzman at his blog.  (My posts have been bi-monthly rather than monthly because I’ve been neglecting my blog a bit lately.)  As always, the photos were shot at Murphy Hanrehan Park in the suburbs of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis.  Some of them were taken in the evening and some were taken late morning.